Other - Reproduction


Fejes (2005) and Mjøen (2006) carried out epidemiological studies on the association of RFR exposure and reproductive capacity. Fejes correlated semen characteristics with cell phone use in 371 men attending an infertility clinic, and found that the men using their cell phones more than 60 minutes a day had a lower proportion of rapid progressive sperm than those using their phones for less than 15 minutes a day. Mjøen linked data on reproductive outcomes derived from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway with data on paternal occupation derived from the general population census, and did not find a correlation between RFR exposure and adverse effects on the men's offspring. For more on these studies, see "Research - Epidemiology".

Erogul (2006) studied a semen sample from 27 men. There was a decrease in the mean percentages of rapid progressive and slow progressive categories of sperm movement, and an increase in the percentage of no motility category. This study failed to mention SAR levels, or whether or not temperature levels were recorded in the specimens.

Reference:

Authors
Agarwal A, Desai NR, Makker K, Varghese A, Mouradi R, Sabanegh E, Sharma R.
Title
Effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic waves (RF-EMW) from cellular phones on human ejaculated semen: an in vitro pilot study.
Journal
Fertil Steril. Ahead of print 18 Sep 2008.

Authors
Baste V, Riise T, Moen BE.
Title
Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields; male infertility and sex ratio of offspring.
Journal
Eur J Epidemiol. Ahead of print 16 Apr 2008.

Authors
Erogul O, Oztas E, Yildirim I, Kir T, et al.
Title
Effects of electromagnetic radiation from a cellular phone on human sperm motility.
Journal
Arch Med Res 2006;37:840-843.
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Authors
Falzone N, Huyser C, Fourie F, Toivo T , Leszczynski D, Franken D.
Title
In vitro effect of pulsed 900 MHz GSM radiation on mitochondrial membrane potential and motility of human spermatozoa.
Journal
Bioelectromagnetics 2008;29(4);268-276.



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